Daisy HayMr. and Mrs. Disraeli: A Strange Romance

July 25, 2015

As I imagine most any biographer will tell you, one of the great joys and privileges of biographical research is using archives. This is where one encounters tangible pieces of the subject's life- letters, diaries, receipts, knick-knacks; one never knows what one will find. But how to incorporate that experience into a book? This is […]

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William LeoGrande and Peter KornbluhBack Channel to Cuba: The Hidden History of Negotiations Between Washington and Havana

July 24, 2015

In December 2014, Cuba and the United States announced their renewed efforts to normalize relations. Diplomatic ties were severed in 1961 following the rise of Fidel Castro and the intensification during the Cold War. An economic and intellectual embargo was instituted by President Kennedy, arguing that Cuba needed to be sealed from the free world […]

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Derek SayerPrague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History

July 24, 2015

Prague, according to Derek Sayer, is the place "in which modernist dreams have time and again unraveled." In this sweeping history of surrealism centered on Prague as both a physical location and the "magic capital" in the imagination of leading surrealists such as André Breton and Paul Éluard, Sayer takes the reader on a thematic […]

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John H. WaltonThe Lost World of Adam and Eve: Genesis 2-3 and the Human Origins Debate

July 24, 2015

For centuries the story of Adam and Eve has resonated richly through the corridors of art, literature, and theology. But, for most modern readers, taking it at face value is incongruous. New insights from anthropology and population genetics–let alone evolutional biology–complicate any attempt to reconcile them with a biblical account of human origins. Indeed, for […]

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Geoff Megargee, ed.The USHMM Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos

July 21, 2015

Every semester when I get to the point in World Civ when we're talking about Nazi Germany, I ask my students to guess how many camps and ghettos there were.  I get guesses anywhere from a few, to a few dozen, to a couple thousand.  When I tell them that the true number is above […]

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Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin LewisThe Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics

July 21, 2015

Who were the Indo-Europeans? Were they all-conquering heroes? Aggressive patriarchal Kurgan horsemen, sweeping aside the peaceful civilizations of Old Europe? Weed-smoking drug dealers rolling across Eurasia in a cannabis-induced haze? Or slow-moving but inexorable farmers from Anatolia? These are just some of the many possibilities discussed in the scholarly literature. But in 2012, a New […]

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Megan ThrelkeldPan-American Women: U.S. Internationalists and Revolutionary Mexico

July 21, 2015

Megan Threlkeld is an associate professor of history at Denison University. Her book Pan-American Women: U.S. Internationalists and Revolutionary Mexico (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014) provides a rich transnational examination of the years following World War I and American women activists who saw themselves global leaders in promoting women's rights and international peace. U.S. internationalists […]

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Kyle G. VolkMoral Minorities and the Making of American Democracy

July 21, 2015

Kyle G. Volk is an associate professor of history at the University of Montana. His book Moral Minorities and the Making of American Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2014) provides a compelling narrative of how nineteenth-century Americans negotiated the tension between majority rule and minority rights and between representative democracy and popular democracy. He focuses on […]

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Eric ReedSelling the Yellow Jersey: The Tour de France in the Global Era

July 17, 2015

The Tour de France is happening right now! The 2015 edition started on July 4th and will continue until July 26th. I'm excited to be able to share this interview with Eric Reed about his new book, Selling the Yellow Jersey: The Tour de France in the Global Era (University of Chicago Press, 2015) as […]

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Jonathan CoopersmithFaxed: The Rise and Fall of the Fax Machine

July 17, 2015

Jonathan Coopersmith's new book takes readers through the century-and-a-half-long history of the fax machine and the technologies that shaped and were shaped by it, from Alexander Bain's 1843 patent to the computer-based faxing of the end of the 20th century. Faxed: The Rise and Fall of the Fax Machine (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015) chronicles the […]

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