Domna StantonThe Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France: Women Writ, Women Writing

January 28, 2016

Domna Stanton's latest book The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France: Women Writ, Women Writing (Ashgate, 2014) is a series of six case studies with important literary, historical, and theoretical implications for how we think about gender in the seventeenth century and beyond. In two parts, the first focused on male and the second […]

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Patrick HagopianAmerican Immunity: War Crime and the Limits of International Law

January 26, 2016

After World War II, the newly formed United Nations and what might be called a global community of nations that included the United States, worked to create a more extensive code of international law. The urge stemmed from the events of World War II, including the atrocities of the war that resulted in war crimes […]

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Nicholas WaltonGenoa, ‘La Superba': The Rise and Fall of a Merchant Pirate Superpower

January 19, 2016

Italians have a reputation for being rather, well, ineffectual. Everyone 'knows' that Italian trains don't run on time unless Italy is ruled by a bald, bombastic, bully. And of course historians will tell you that they didn't even run on time then. The food is excellent, the scenery marvelous, the weather wonderful. Italians know how to live […]

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Arthur DudneyDelhi: Pages From A Forgotten History

January 18, 2016

Delhi: Pages From A Forgotten History (Hay House India, 2015) by Arthur Dudney tells the story of India's capital and beyond through the lens of Persian literary culture. A lively read written for a mass readership, the book details the lives of poets and emperors along with the origins, rise and decline of Persian in the subcontinent. […]

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Patrick D. BowenA History of Conversion to Islam in the United States, Volume 1: White American Muslims before 1975

January 12, 2016

In the current political moment there is widespread anti-Muslim rhetoric and it would be easy to conclude that a large portion of white Americans see Islam at odds with American values. But a longer view of history reveals a long-standing appreciation for Islam and even conversion to the tradition among white Americans. Patrick D. Bowen, […]

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Luke Nichter and Douglas BrinkleyThe Nixon Tapes: 1973

January 11, 2016

Luke Nichter and Douglas Brinkley are the editors of The Nixon Tapes: 1973 (Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt 2015). Nichter is associate professor of history at Texas A&M University and Brinkley is professor of history at Rice University. For students of the Nixon presidency, this book offers a treasure trove of gems. Nichter and Brinkley have followed […]

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Howard Brick and Christopher PhelpsRadicals in America: The U.S. Left since the Second World War

January 11, 2016

Christopher Phelps is an associate professor at the University of Nottingham and co-author of Radicals in America: The U.S. Left since the Second World War (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Phelps and Howard Brick have written a comprehensive history of the American left. Beginning with the multiple strands of radicalism prior to 1940, the book traces […]

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Abram de SwaanThe Killing Compartments: The Mentality of Mass Murder

January 11, 2016

For a couple of decades, scholars have moved toward a broad consensus that context, rather than ideology, is most important in pushing ordinary men and women to participate in mass murder.  The "situationist paradigm," as Abram de Swaan labels this, concludes from studies by psychologists, sociologists, historians and others, that individuals are malleable, easily influenced […]

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Eric FonerGateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad

January 5, 2016

In this podcast I talk with Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University about his book, Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad (W. W. Norton & Company, 2015). Per the book jacket, "More than any other scholar, Eric Foner has influenced our understanding of America's history. Now, making brilliant […]

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James A. BennTea in China: A Religious and Cultural History

January 4, 2016

James A. Benn's new book is a history of tea as a religious and cultural commodity in China before it became a global commodity in the nineteenth century. Focusing on the Tang and Song dynasties (with brief extensions earlier and later), Tea in China: A Religious and Cultural History (University of Hawaii Press, 2015) demonstrates that a […]

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